HANDCRAFTED MEMORIALS

Yale Pioneer Cemetery, BC

CROSSES

Cut Knife, SK
Cut Knife Cemetery, Cut Knife, SK

 

Banff, AB
The Old Banff Cemetery, Banff, AB

 

Whitecourt, AB
Church, Heritage Park at the Forest Interpretive Centre, Whitecourt, AB

 

Skaro Shrine, AB
Skaro Shrine, Lamont, AB
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Tom Wilson, Trail Blazer

SUNDAY SUNSHINE

Tom Wilson, Trail Blazer
The gravesite of Thomas Edmonds Wilson and his wife Minnie McDougall Wilson in Banff cemetery, Banff, AB. Tom Wilson was a NWMP Officer, CPR survey packer, trapper, prospector, mountain guide and outfitter, rancher, and trail blazer.

Tom Wilson’s early explorations of the Rocky Mountains were instrumental to trail development in the Banff and Yoho valley areas. The bronze plaque in the above photo was originally mounted near the Takakkaw Falls in the Yoho valley but was relocated to his gravesite upon his death. Mount Wilson, near the Columbia Icefield, is named after him.

Read more about Thomas Edmonds Wilson in the Dictionary of Canadian Biography.

Sleeping Rough…

The effect was alchemical. When I stuck my head in the light of dawn… somehow I belonged in a way that I hadn’t before. Sleeping out produced a sense of enhanced connection with the land, a feeling almost akin to ownership: the paradoxical entitlement of the rough sleeper; whose lack of rights somehow grants him a greater right than anyone else.

– by Nick Hunt, describing his first night ‘sleeping rough’ on his long distance walking expedition across Europe in Walking the Woods and the Water: In Patrick Leigh Fermor’s footsteps from the Hook of Holland to the Golden Horn, 2014.

Winter Travel Clothing, 1865

Perhaps I am the best clad in the party, and my clothes altogether will not weigh much. A flannel shirt, moleskin pants, full length leggings with garters below the knees, duffil socks and neat moccasins, a Hudson’s Bay capote, unlined and unpadded in any part, a light cap, and mittens which are most of the time tied on the load, while I wear a pair of thin unlined buckskin gloves. This is in a sense almost “laying aside every weight,” but the race which was set before the ordinary dog-driver in the days I am writing of was generally sufficient to keep him warm.

 

In my own case, I did not for several years wear any underclothing, and though in the buffalo country, and a buffalo hunter, I never had room or transport for a buffalo coat until the Canadian Pacific Railroad reached Alberta, and the era of heavy clothing and ponderous boots came in, with ever and anon men frozen to death in them! Not so with us; we run and lift and pull and push, and are warm.

– by John McDougall, describing winter travel by dogsled circa 1865 in Pathfinding on Plain and Prairie: Stirring Scenes of Life in the Canadian North-West, 1898.

Trail Markers

Arctic with Inukshuk

FLASHBACK FRIDAY

When Europeans began to explore the continent, circa the 1500s, they discovered that indigenous North Americans had a well-established system of way-markers in place for their trails. This shouldn’t be a surprise since First Nations peoples had been traveling over this vast expanse since the end of the last ice age, approximately 20,000 years ago.

Trail marking methods varied greatly, depending on available materials. For example, in temperate climates, hard wood trees were selected, then manipulated to form particular shapes. Trail marker and signal trees were used as tools for navigation and as signposts for sites of a religious or ceremonial nature.  To read more, visit the Great Lakes Trail Marker Tree Society and view photos at Indian Trail Trees.

In more barren terrain, for example in the arctic regions of most northern countries, large single rocks acted as markers for a wide variety of activities. They were reference markers and points of navigation; they marked hunting or fishing spots, camps, food caches or sacred places. Some argue that the human-shaped inukshuk, which we know so well, today, is a post-European development. These rock structures have come to symbolize the North for many of us and many are, in fact, still in use today. For more on Inukshuk, visit Wikipedia and the Inukshuk Gallery.

Inukshuk, Clyde River, Nunavut
Inukshuk, Clyde River, Nunavut, Canada
Inukshuk, Clyde River, Nunavut
Inukshuk, Clyde River, Nunavut, Canada